Menu

Statements of Excellence for Admission to Medical School

I attend to my clients in the order in which I have received their payments.

All of the Statement samples on this web site were written more than 2 years ago and all are anonymous. 

Up to 1000 words: US$199  + CV/Resume Edit US$299.00

Up to 1500 words: US$249  + CV/Resume Edit US$349

Up to 2000 words: US$299  + CV/Resume Edit US$399

drrobertedinger@gmail.comSkype: DrRobertEdinger

 

Search by Degree, Field, or Country of Origin

Multiracial American Medical School Personal Statement Sample

A black woman of African and Indian ancestry, while born and raised in the USA, my parents are from Guyana and Jamaica; thus, I carry with me an inherent celebration of diversity in the Americas. A native speaker of English, I am also nearing fluency in French and increasingly comfortable conversing in Spanish – having studied and exceled at both languages in college. I hope to be accepted to medical school at least in part on the basis of my potential to contribute to missionary medicine and to use my Spanish as well as my French in the future on medical missions to the Developing World.

Fully devoted to lifelong education, after completing medical school I plan to seek further academic immersion in the area of Anesthesia. This will enable me to maximize my contribution in support of surgeons in an area where multilingual communication is able to save many lives.

From New York City, when I began volunteering at XXXX Hospital in Brooklyn, New York in June of 2009, at 14 years old, I had to struggle to convince them that I was old enough. At that time, I was already day dreaming constantly about becoming a doctor, which is why I was there. Every day that I walked through the doors at Downstate, my desire was more fully confirmed, especially because I could not wait to get there each day to start my shift. Scheduling, filing, answering the telephone, I created and maintained spreadsheets of confidential patient information and I thought of myself as serving at the epi-center of the front lines of health care in my community. I fell in love with my environment and served at Downstate for a full year before I began giving my all to my next volunteer position, at Kings County Hospital, also in Brooklyn. My most recent volunteer experience at XXXX Center in Wildwood, Georgia, further confirmed that I was on the right track, shadowing doctors and engaging with a lot of creative material and practices in holistic medicine.

After my time at Wildwood, I was accepted into an internship at XXXX Health Medical Center. My time there was enjoyable and very enriching: working in the laboratory and learning a great deal about how a hospital is run and how physicians are part of a much larger organization, along with the great importance of teamwork. I could not have been happier to have the honor to work alongside pathologists as part of their team. During my time at XXXX, I met the Chief Medical Officer Dr. XXXX at a networking event and he shared with me his great passion for medicine and medical education and greatly inspired my own determination to excel at medicine and medical education. At the close of my internship, I went to visit Dr. Westphal at his office. He told me that the best type of physician was the physician who cared enough to build an authentic relationship with their patients; not the physician who just comes into the room and reads the patient’s chart.

As an undergraduate student, I had the amazing fortune of working at my school’s Multicultural Resource Center, helping to coordinate programs for the student body and community groups in the Albany, NY area. There, I met a Girl Scout named Leah, a most precocious little girl. She told me that she wanted to sing and become an actress like her idol Ariana Grande. But then she proceeded to tell me that she had Sickle Cell Anemia and despite what her parents told her, she conducted her own research and concluded that she wouldn't live very long, lamenting that she would not have time to become a singer or an actress. Immediately a lump formed in my throat: how could this little girl who hasn't reach the age of 10 tell me with such certainty that she was soon going to die? I explained to her that I knew people my age and older with the disease and assured her that she could do whatever she wanted to do with her life despite the disease. By the end of our conversation Leah was a bit more optimistic and seem to again be enthused about researching some of the performing arts schools in her area. She helped me to better understand and appreciate the life-saving importance of medicine. I am most thankful for this experience and the opportunities that I have had to work in patient care facilities, or as Broward termed it as part of the “careforce.” 

Never have I been hospitalized myself until recently. In February of this year, I was hospitalized for two weeks and bed-ridden for one month. At first, I could not walk and was barely able to eat – but did fully recover. Despite having friends and family visit during my hospital stay, I found myself crying every day. This run in with my own health issues also served to enhance my ongoing appreciation of the importance of empathy in patient care. I now want to give my life to holistic health care and showing compassion, helping each patient to achieve the brightest outlook on life possible, understanding and appreciating the very best that life itself has to offer.

I thank you for considering my application to medical school.